JLF panel explores future of AI

Tuesday, 29 January 2019, 06:44 Hrs
32
cmt right
35
Comment Right
71
cmt right
15
cmt right
Printer Print Email Email
JLF panel explores future of AI


"In 50 years, we'll probably have a robot conducting this session," said author Anupama Raju in her opening comments on Monday at the session "The Future is Now" in the ongoing Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF), giving voice to an increasingly popular concern: will robots take over the world, our jobs and life as we know it?

A panel of eminent technologists Meredith Broussard and Toby Walsh was in conversation with Raju on the concluding day of the Festival.

"Scientists work within the envelope of the dreams that writers tell us," said Walsh, an Artificial Intelligence (AI) professor, stating that the world is now waking up to the ideas that have been explored by science fictions writers such as Isaac Asimov for over 50 years.

Data journalism professor Broussard said that Hollywood has "coloured" our perception of AI with movies such as "The Terminator", which portray robots as "evil machines that take over humanity".

She called the fictional narratives "interesting but far from reality", stating that there is "very little to fear" about AI.

Walsh argued that the real concern with AI is actually its "incompetence: We are giving decision making ability to machines that are not capable of making choices that are fair and meet the values of the society we'd like".

Walsh, who has written "2062: The World that AI Made", however, batted for the greater rationality of machines over humans.

"Humans are terribly irrational," she said.

Broussard argued that computers, limited by their ability to merely executing what they are programmed to do, would "discriminate by default: The world is racist and sexist and has all kinds of social and economic inequality".

Agreeing that AI doesn't have an opinion and simply reflects the values of the people who build it, Walsh said that using computers to make a fairer world would certainly require immense prudence and hard-work.

"It's the same as how chemistry makes the world a better place if we think carefully about not over-fertilising our soil or using nuclear bombs."

The panel also explored the impact of AI through the example of the popular debate on the use of driverless cars. 

Walsh said that driverless cars would help save millions of lives, be economically beneficial by reducing transportation costs, prevent truck attacks by terrorists, and free people to do more productive tasks than driving.

Broussard, author of "Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World", was admittedly "sceptical".

Narrating an incident where she almost got killed by a driverless car, she explained, among other issues, how such cars' "image-recognition algorithms could be easily defeated", thereby resulting in accidents.

The JLF concludes later on Monday evening.



Read more news:

Google created most positive buzz in India in 2018: Report

I feel responsible: Karan Johar on Pandya, Rahul row


Source: IANS
SPOTLIGHT
Gadgets
Yamaha Music India has launched its first Indian keyboard PSR I500 under the 'Make in India' initi..
Finance
India's tea exports increased by 11.5 per cent to 17.93 million kgs in April this year aga..
Technology
To ensure uninterrupted functioning of the app in areas of low networks, Facebook-owned..
Travel
Imagine life being a romantic Bollywood song of the 90's. All those exotic frames punched into one..
Career
Les Roches Global Hospitality Education, a multi-national hospitality management institute, a..
Business
Automobile major MG Motors India on Wednesday said that it plans to manufacture electric vehicle E..
Entertainment
Actor Dhanush, whose last Hindi release was R. Balkis "Shamitabh", may be working in another H..
Enterprise IT
Taking on streaming giants like Netflix and Hulu, Walt Disney Co. has announced it will ..
Startup City
With cities growing rapidly and infrastructure not keeping pace, the daunting work com..